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How to Prevent Injury During Distance Running Training

How to Prevent Injury

How to prevent Injury during Distance Running Training

The risk of injury in distance running increases as severe and sudden changes made in the training schedule, it could be a sudden increase in the number of days in a week you are to train. Almost all runners battle with one or more injuries each year. Every runner has a different mental and physical condition. A good coach that will help evaluates factors in detail that influences a training program should be hired, contribute to set up a training program depending on the runner’s mix.

Aiming to get an effective and safe system? Then Jack Daniels principles of training listed below can serve.

  • Knowledge of your training necessities

Since what works perfectly for one might not work for another, you always have to keep in mind the purpose of the training session and specific needs to achieve the goal.

  • Setting your own pace

Copying the current, and previous champion’s approach to training doesn’t always work, but can be used to support your training program. Challenge yourself with training on the foundation of scientific principles. “When you hear about a new approach to training, don’t just try to copy it rather try to analyze it,” says Jack Daniels. Know the benefits to your body’s system.

Do not follow all publicly released athlete’s training, because to gain recognition, some runners lie about their training schedule and even in the training log to give people the impression that their training is demanding.

Another risk of following previous champions, training is the difference in body type. According to Jack Daniels, know your type of body, your strengths, and weaknesses, be true to yourself regarding your abilities, try to learn what works for you, why it works for you, and why you are considering trying something new in your approach. Before you follow a suggested workout, know your present fitness level, experience level, and goals.

The following sets of questions are adapted from “Jack Daniels,” and will help in evaluating an athlete’s training needs. In the process of your distance running training, you must ask yourself this list of questions:

What is your present fitness level? Are you ready to train and compete?

How much time in a week(s) are you available for a season’s best performance?

How many hours in a day, days in a week will you be available for training?

What are your pros and cons, as regards speed, endurance, aerobic capacity, economy, and reaction to different amounts of running?

What training type do you prefer? To what training-type do you respond well too psychologically? What specific event are you preparing for?

How should periodic races fit into the training program?

What are the environmental conditions of the distance running competition?

Injury is less about damaged tissues and more about your sensitivity and irritation. Addition of weight lifting and jump to your training could help reduce injuries. Try not to go overboard during workouts as this may increase the risk of injury. After the marathon, allow your body to rest for a week or two before setting another goal.

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